ISSUE 6, July 2003
Editorial
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle: Elementary, my dear brother
Travel: Magic of the Emerald Isle
Letters
Masonic clocks
Quarterly Communication and Annual Investiture
Masonic charity: 200 masons run for Crisis and Grand Charity and The Royal Masonic Trust for Girls and Boys and The Royal Masonic Benevolent Institution
Supreme Grand Chapter: Annual Investiture
Masonic education: Events for Freemasons
Library & Museum of Freemasonry: Exhibition on ladies nights
Gardening
Book reviews

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The Queen honours Masonic Trust for Girls and Boys with 'Royal' prefix
The Queen has been content for the Masonic Trust for Girls and Boys (MTGB) to be named `Royal Masonic Trust for Girls and Boys'.
     The official announcement was made on 30th April 2003 by His Royal Highness the Duke of Kent, Grand Master of the United Grand Lodge of England, and Grand President of the Trust, at a regular meeting of Grand Lodge in London.
     President of the new Royal Masonic Trust for Girls and Boys, Andrew Stebbings, said: "This news is welcomed by the Council of the Trust and is a great honour for all of the members of the Craft throughout England and Wales."
     The Royal Masonic Trust for Girls and Boys is one of the central Masonic charities. The primary aim of the Trust is to assist with the education and welfare of the children of deceased or distressed Freemasons.
     When funds permit, however, the Trust may also assist non-Masonic children by giving grants to other children's charities. During last year, over 3,000 individual young people benefited from assistance. Sixty non-Masonic organisations also benefited from donations.
     In addition, throughout England and Wales, 25 children's hospices enjoy the benefits of the Trust's 7.5 million lifelites information technology scheme. lifelites is a special fund - established in 1998 as the Trust's millennium project - that provides networked multi-media communications and computer-aided educational and recreational facilities to the children in the hospices.
NMSF faces new challenges as it celebrates its 13th birthday
In November 2003 the New Masonic Samaritan Fund will celebrate its 13th birthday.
     As it enters its teenage years it will inevitably face many new challenges.
     Arguably the most important of them is to ensure that all those eligible for support submit an application.
     The Fund has already provided support to over 5,000 people at a total cost in the region of 21 million.
     This level of success has only been made possible by the generous support of many people.
     Individually and collectively they have enabled the Fund to maintain the proud boast that no applicant has ever been turned down through a lack of available funds.
     Despite this marvellous achievement there is concern that the Fund could have done more.
     Support is available to Freemasons and the wives, widows and dependants of Freemasons.
     In each of the last two years applications made on behalf of the wives, widows and dependants of Freemasons have accounted for roughly half of the total funds allocated. Within the same time-span the average age of applicants has risen to 72.
     However, funding has recently been provided for individuals ranging in age from five to 95.
     The potential demand is enormous, which reinforces the belief that a significant number of eligible applicants are not aware of the support that may be available.
     If you know someone who has an identified medical need and, faced with a long wait on the NHS, cannot afford to fund private medical treatment, please tell them about the NMSF and tell the NMSF about them.

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