ISSUE 6, July 2003
Editorial
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle: Elementary, my dear brother
Travel: Magic of the Emerald Isle
Letters
Masonic clocks
Quarterly Communication and Annual Investiture
Masonic charity: 200 masons run for Crisis and Grand Charity and The Royal Masonic Trust for Girls and Boys and The Royal Masonic Benevolent Institution
Supreme Grand Chapter: Annual Investiture
Masonic education: Events for Freemasons
Library & Museum of Freemasonry: Exhibition on ladies nights
Gardening
Book reviews

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Letters to the Editor

Old Masonic Memorial
Leonard Greenwood's letter (MQ, Issue No. 5) about the gravestone of former Grand Secretary Philip Colville Smith reminded me of a recent visit to the Old Jewish cemetery at Curacao in the Netherlands Antilles.
     Here in the West Indies I discovered an interesting memorial with Masonic emblems on each of its four sides. The inscription on the front reads:

     AQUI YACE
     MOISES ABRAHAM JESURUS
    
On one side is the date of birth - 1799 - and on the other side the date of death - 1853. The memorial was in significantly better condition than the majority in this vast cemetery. As can be seen from the photograph, the cemetery, which dates from 1545, is adjacent to an oil refinery.
     Philip Romain Stanmore, Middlesex
Thanks from an 'Old Girl'
Last November I was cruising aboard Cunard's Coronia. As is customary on cruise ships, there was a get-together of Freemasons on board.
     Ten of us gathered at one of the ship's bars enjoying a drink with the compliments of the captain, who was not present as he was not a Freemason.
     We all signed a register - normally kept on board - giving details of our Lodges, Province and ranks. A lady in her early seventies came along, introduced herself and expressed most profoundly her gratitude to the Craft for the education she had received at the Rickmansworth Masonic Girls' School.
     Her expression was such that it made us feel so happy that our charity is so much appreciated. Perhaps a little more openness of the good work done by Masonic charities would not go unnoticed.
     Reg Stephens, Sutton Coldfield
Give us a Call
The City University Lodge No. 7962 has no means of contacting serving or retired staff or students who may be members of other Lodges.
     Anyone desirous of having further information on our four meetings a year is invited to telephone either 01778 440 488 or 01278 789 319.
     TJ Hughes Burnham-on-Sea, Somerset
Unfair to MacNulty
I feel that your reviewer does less than justice to Kirk MacNulty's book The Way of the Craftsman (MQ, Issue 5).
     In developing the proposition that King Solomon's Temple symbolises the human mind, and that building it represents personal development, MacNulty is following a well-established tradition.
     W L Wilmshurst explored Masonic symbolism in similar depth in his book The Meaning of Masonry, the eighth edition of which was published as long ago as 1939.
     To charge MacNulty with 'creativity' in invoking psychoanalytic theory to explain our symbolism is to accuse him of speciousness, and I think this is unwarranted.
     Psychoanalytic theory has moved on since the days of Freud and Jung, and has stood me and my clients in good stead during my 20 years as a psychotherapist.
     My own quarrel with MacNulty is that he confines himself to the three degrees of the Craft. Surely no examination of the symbolism of Freemasonry can claim to be complete while totally ignoring the Royal Arch.
     David Brewster, Woking, Surrey
The Two Minervas
With reference to the article 'Full of Eastern Promise' (MQ, Issue No. 5) concerning the Swan Hellenic ship Minerva, the photo on page 12 is the old Minerva, which from 1st May became Saga Pearl, operated by Saga Cruises. Early in 2004 she is expected to go to the revived Union Castle Line as Explorer II for a voyage around South Africa and up to Southampton.
     The photos on page 14 are of Minerva II, Swan Hellenic's new ship. She is the former R8 of the now defunct Renaissance Cruises, and is of considerably larger size, being 30,277 gross registered tonnes against the old Minerva's 12,331 grt.
     Alex Kerby, Burnham-on-Sea, Somerset
Trinity College Lodge Plea
Trinity College Lodge No. 1765, which was founded by the Trinity College of Music and both enjoyed a very close relationship for many years, will be celebrating its 175th anniversary in October 2003.
     We have a number of gaps in our history which we hope to amend in our latest effort to produce a 125th anniversary brochure detailing a comprehensive and interesting history of the Lodge and its associations with the Trinity College of Music and Taylor's ritual.
     We are anxious to learn further of the eminent members of Trinity College of Music who founded the Lodge and associated with it for many years. In particular, we seek further knowledge about the Reverend Bonovia Hunt, a founder member.
     Our interest in Taylor's ritual, which we believe was first published around the turn of the century under the title Manual of Handbook of Craft Masonry by Malborough Milbanke Taylor, stems from him becoming a joining member of the Lodge in 1893 and Master in 1898. He remained a Lodge member until his death in 1913.
     We would appreciate any information useful to our efforts and rest assured it will be gratefully received and faithfully applied.
     Charles Eist, 164 Stanstead Road, Forest Hill, London SE23 1BZ
New Forest Restaurants
I must take issue with Natasha Blair's view that the New Forest is particularly short of good restaurants. Over the past 12 years - the last four of which we had a holiday home in the area - we have enjoyed wonderful meals in countless restaurants.
     The quality and wide range of choice has been superbly presented in beautiful surroundings, and at far more reasonable prices than those quoted in the article.
     I suggest a return trip to the Forest and visiting, for example, Christchurch, Barton-on-Sea, Highcliffe and Milford-on-Sea, just four of dozens of excellent villages and towns which have many eating houses to choose from on a par with many London eateries.
     Mrs C A Stone, Welling, Kent

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