ISSUE 3, October 2002
Editorial
Brother Winston: Churchill as a Freemason
Travel: Getting the taste
Manchester City: Masons achieve their goal
Freemasonry in the Community: Sermon of the Dean of St Paul's Cathedral and Chief Executive spells out the five objectives of the Grand Charity
Quarterly Communication: Report of the Board of General Purposes and Address by the Pro Grand Master
A Dickens of a Night: Charles Dickens celebrated
   Masonic Research: Seek and ye shall find
Charity News: New Masonic Samaritan Fund and Grand Charity and Cornwall Freemasons raise 2.8m and MTGB: Special concert in the Grand Temple and RMBI: Care in action
Library and Museum: Burmese banners and Royal British Legion link
Letters
Freemasonry in the Community: Supplement
Gardening
Book reviews

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If the Masons' involvement in the club's early history is debatable (and even the club's official historian, Andrew Waldon, admits much about the team's formative years will forever remain in doubt), the same cannot be said of their role in the glory years of the late 1960s and early 1970s.
    When Sidney Rose first joined the board in 1964, five out of the six directors were Masons, and it was Albert Alexander, another Mason, who as chairman made the decision to choose former Arsenal captain Joe Mercer as manager in 1965.
    It was an inspired appointment, and under his leadership City swept all before them at home and abroad, winning the FA Cup, League Championship and European Cup Winners' Cup.
    Both Mercer and a number of his team, including Tony Book, captain of the 1968 Championship winning side, were either at the time or later became Masons. Many of the backroom staff, such as trainer Johnny Hart, are also thought to have had Masonic connections.
    Hughie Murray, currently the Provincial Grand Tyler for the Province of East Lancashire, remembers a strong Masonic connection even in the pre-Mercer days when he joined the club as a 17-year-old apprentice in 1953. 'The scout came to sign me,' says Hughie, a promising outside-left in his time, 'and I just remember him being made up that my father, like him, was a Mason. Obviously I was too young to be involved, but I think he was quite happy, as Les McDowall, the manager at the time, was also a Mason.'

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