ISSUE 3, October 2002
Editorial
Brother Winston: Churchill as a Freemason
Travel: Getting the taste
Manchester City: Masons achieve their goal
Freemasonry in the Community: Sermon of the Dean of St Paul's Cathedral and Chief Executive spells out the five objectives of the Grand Charity
Quarterly Communication: Report of the Board of General Purposes and Address by the Pro Grand Master
A Dickens of a Night: Charles Dickens celebrated
   Masonic Research: Seek and ye shall find
Charity News: New Masonic Samaritan Fund and Grand Charity and Cornwall Freemasons raise 2.8m and MTGB: Special concert in the Grand Temple and RMBI: Care in action
Library and Museum: Burmese banners and Royal British Legion link
Letters
Freemasonry in the Community: Supplement
Gardening
Book reviews

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The club had some early success, finishing fifth in their first season, but they soon faced financial problems, and in 1894 had to be rescued from bankruptcy by the then club secretary, Joshua Parlby.
    It was at this time that they adopted the name Manchester City and the Masonic colours of pale blue shirts and white shorts. Because of the lack of detailed records, there is no irrefutable proof that either Parlby or his predecessor Lawrence Furniss (also thought to have been closely linked to the Craft) were Masons, but Sidney Rose, lifetime president of the club and a director for much of the last 30 years, has no such doubts.
    'It's always been my understanding,' says Sidney, a member of the Old Mancunians' Lodge, 'that the real founders of the club became involved in 1894 when there was some sort of financial crisis, and that they were Masons, or certainly had close Masonic links.
    'That was why they started playing in pale blue, the colours of Freemasonry. Until that time, the club had always played in red and black.'




The Early History of Manchester City

1865 St Mark's Church in West Gorton, East Manchester.
1880 With the local men thought to be spending too much time 'scuttling', or fighting as it is better known, it was decided to set up a football club to better occupy their time. The club, named St Mark's (West Gorton), play their first game in November, losing 2-1 to Baptist Church (Macclesfield).
1881 Wanting to recruit players from outside the St Mark's congregation, the club changes its name to West Gorton (St Mark's). Home games are also moved from Clowes Street, their first home, to Kirkmanshulme Cricket Club.
1884 The club is renamed Gorton AFC after merging with another local side, Gorton Athletic. Home games are now played on waste ground near Belle Vue Station.
1887 Gorton AFC moves to nearby Ardwick, changing their name accordingly.
1892 Ardwick joins the Football League, regularly getting crowds of 5,000.
1894 Ardwick is declared bankrupt, only to be rescued by Joshua Parlby and restarted as Manchester City FC.
1904 Manchester City win their first major honours, defeating Bolton Wanderers in the FA Cup final.
1922-1923 Work begins on Main Road, Manchester City's new ground. Work costs 200,000, with the stadium holding an estimated 85,000 fans.

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