ISSUE 23, October 2007

Editorial
Quarterly Communication: Speech of the Pro Grand Master : Quarterly Communication
Grand Secretary: Exciting times ahead
Historic: Telford - Mason extraordinary
Travel: Cruising round Sicily
Samaritan: Helping the distressed
Younger Masons: The common bond
Jersey: Local Masons guard the Duke
   Classic car run: Down memory lane
International: Joseph Brant - a Masonic legend
Universities Scheme: The way ahead
Grand Chancellor: The importance of external relations
Education: Events : Understanding the symbols of the craft
Specialist Lodges: Australia link
Royal Arch: Why join the Royal Arch?
Lbrary & Museum: Major award for Library & Museum
MQ Signs off
Masonic Charities: Grand Charity : NMSF : RMBI : RMTGB
Letters, Book reviews, Gardening

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Introducing lighting into your garden has numerous benefits. Gone is the time when it was just used for a driveway or security.
     Today, there are various ways that it can enhance your garden, allow you to stay outside longer in the evenings, and ultimately be a deterrent for burglars.
     At the moment, there are three types of lighting. Solar, which is cheap and ecologically friendly but, unfortunately, tends not to be very effective as its illumination is not very strong.
     Then there is plug and play, the do-it-yourself version where you plug a transformer into an indoor or outdoor socket and position the lights yourself, and the custom-designed and installed lighting systems which often include aspects of the first two.
     Even if you plan to use the do-it-yourself route you might not, until you get started, realise what a minefield it is.
     Initially, you will have to decide what you want to illuminate and then investigate what options are available. You will need to think about your home and the areas around it the building itself, both front and back the driveway, pathways, patio, decking, whatever you have, and then decide whether all or just part of it comes into the equation.
     Secondly, the garden itself are you just looking at lighting your bedding plants and trees or do you want to highlight the odd feature such as a statue or a pond? You will need to look at the voltage systems. There are two different types.
     Low voltage is used for highlighting bedding, low statues, decking and walkways, and mains voltage (240v) which is for larger objects such as buildings, large trees or even a big statue.
     Then there is the question of what type of bulbs to use. This will vary depending on what type of effect you want to achieve as well as the resulting colour. You will also need to bear in mind that large halogen casings can be unsightly, with the bulbs having the reputation for not lasting very long. Colour, too, is important. Sodium bulbs will give an orange/yellow glow, while a metal halide will produce a blue/white colour.
     As technology progresses, LEDs are becoming much more commonplace. The lamps, which are available in various colours, are becoming cheaper and the bulbs, which last virtually a lifetime, utilise a minimal amount of electricity. These are ideal for walkways, decking and steps. A bonus is that, because of their low output, you can add multiple lights onto a single transformer.
     The positioning of your lighting will ultimately determine the effect that you will achieve. For example, you can highlight a tree in various ways. By putting a light in a tree, it will cause a different splash to when you point a light at it.
     Creating the right glow is particularly important if you have a moveable object a statue, for example. You might wish to highlight it from several different angles, using more than one light, depending on the effect you want. A consideration could be that you wish to create a perfect silhouette behind it or just a shadow.


   


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