ISSUE 21, April 2007
Editorial
Historic: Philanthropist and scientist: Sir Henry Wellcome
Travel: In Darwin's footsteps
Grand Secretary: Interview with Nigel Brown
Quarterly Communication: Speech by the Pro Grand Master and Report of the Board of General Purposes
Faith and Freemasonry: A Salvationist and the Craft
Young Mason: Keep up the tradition
Freemasons' Hall: Refurbishment
Ladies Groups: Cheshire Ladies Circle
   Library and Museum: Masonry and music - the role of the organ
Specialist Lodge: A new Lodge for showmen is consecrated
Serving the community: Two Masons win major rescue awards
Spain: How a Cleveland Mason found his Spanish roots
Wales: Welsh Mason lands national sporting award
Hospices: The Craft's historic links with hospices
Ancient Craft: Herefordshire's ancient boat builder
Education: Forthcoming events and Andrew Prescott and Own free will and accord and First Universities Scheme Initiate
Masonic Charities: Latest from the four main Masonic charities
Letters, Book reviews, Gardening

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Are we at the point of our greatest need when we are at the point of our own death?
    As Freemasons we contemplate being summoned from this sublunary abode to the Grand Lodge Above, but do we consider the practicalities?
    How will we face the grim reaper personally? Who will help those left behind and who is there to help us face our personal journey? The hospice movement is there to help. Last year the Grand Charity recognised this with gifts totalling £500,000 to 217 hospices.
    Unlike hospitals, hospices do not seek to cure, but rather enable people who are facing the end of their life to live every moment to the full and free from pain.
    They provide what is called ‘holistic care’ to patients who are dying, addressing the needs of the whole person, physical, emotional and spiritual.
    The aim is to provide a level of care that achieves the best quality of life for patients and their families, including bereavement help if required. While the average length of stay in a hospice may only be three weeks, in that time some can live a lifetime, with the personal freedom to move towards their own aims, which might include resolving long-standing family problems.
    The original hospices can be traced back to Fabiola, a fourth century Roman who opened her home to fulfil the Christian works of mercy: feeding the hungry and thirsty, visiting the sick and prisoners, clothing the naked and welcoming strangers.
    At that time the word “hospis” meant both host and guest and “hospitium” a place where hospitality was given and the relationships that arose. That emphasis is still central to hospice care today. While none were specifically to care for the dying, they welcomed people to stay for as long as they needed help.

The Duchess of Cornwall visits Trinity Hospice




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