ISSUE 20, January 2007
Editorial
Historic: Dr Thomas Barnardo - children's saviour
Travel: South African journey
London Gala Evening: Royal Masonic Variety Show
Centenary Celebrations: Scouting's milestone
Quarterly Communication: Speech by the Pro Grand Master and Report of the Board of General Purposes
Supreme Grand Chapter: Speech by the Pro 1st Grand Principal and Report of the Cttee of General Purposes
Library and Museum: Facets of Fraternity
   Specialist Lodge: Internet Lodge - Masonry on the Web
Special Events: Spamalot and the Alternative Hair Show at Grand Lodge
Freemasons' Hall: ADelphi System - A computer revolution
Mark Master Masons: Duke of Kent at 150th anniversary
Breeches Bible: A Lodge locker's secret
Masonic Arboretum: Planting an idea
Education: Events and The hoodwink
Masonic Charities: RMTGB and Grand Charity and Legacy appeal and RMBI and NMSF
Letters, Book reviews, Gardening

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Enjoying harmonious colours gives quiet satisfaction in the garden




    The garden is a place where you go to relax. You want your eyes to enjoy the harmonious colours, and feel satisfied with what they see. By introducing elements of Feng Shui, which literally means wind and water in Chinese, you can create your own sanctuary of beauty, where you will enjoy tranquillity and peace.
    Creating balance, ‘yin’ and ‘yang’ is a vital part of the equation. The former being the dark, quiet, shady, flat and low areas and yang, the tall, big, bright, sunny, strong and vibrant aspects. Additionally, the five natural elements of water, wood, fire, earth and metal have to be taken into account.
    Each element has a colour associated with it: water being blue and black; wood all shades of green; fire all the shades of orange and red through to purple; earth the browns, yellow, stone, and terracotta colours, while metal is associated with white, gold, silver and copper.
    Paths represent virtual waterways that your ‘chi’ or vital energy flows along, as does the wind, both of which should be flowing gently and harmoniously.
    Straight lines are not usually desirable as they tend to allow chi, or vital energy, to flow too fast, the effect of which subconsciously creates an uneasy feeling within you. By introducing curves into your flower beds and pathways, you are encouraging your vital energy to flow in a more soothing way.
    Blending different forms of foliage also creates a good balance. Put tall plants like bamboo with shorter plants that have plenty of width, and spiky plants such as phormiums with ones that have rounded growth and broad leaves or frondy foliage.
    Select a balance of contrasting colour combinations for foliage as well as flowers and aim to keep this satisfying colour interest throughout the four seasons of the year. Where you have a large garden, it is better to create separate areas, each of which can have a different purpose to introduce a bit of magic and create an element of surprise.
    For example, the southwest corner is considered the area of romance and relationships, so it is nice to have a bench where people can sit together or perhaps a statue of a couple embracing. The northeast is considered the most spiritual, seen as the quiet area, so it is an ideal spot to create a place where a person can sit and contemplate or think.
    Water meanders naturally and having water in the garden is always relaxing, although in terms of Feng Shui some places are more suitable than others.
    It is important, whatever you do, to make sure that it flows towards your home rather than away from it so that you will receive, rather than lose, the benefit of its energy.
    Even an established garden can introduce Feng Shui. This can be very simply done by, for instance, positioning containers to soften an angular corner. With a straight path you can put containers either side or make semi-circular flower beds diagonally along the path to create an ‘S’ shape and a gently meandering effect. The use of stones, pebbles or rocks by containers can create esoterically pleasing and interesting forms.
    Sensitive use of garden architectural features such as statues, gazebos and beautiful stones can help to bring a relaxing harmonious feeling, keeping in mind that it is important not to use angular or harsh shapes. If you have a square terrace, you don’t need to change it because you can introduce harmony by having a round table with perhaps some round pots to bring balance.
    Using ground lighting to illuminate your favourite features in the garden can transform how you feel personally even when you are looking from the inside out, particularly during the long dark winter evenings.

Sylvia Bennett can be contacted on: 01548 580989 or www.fengshui-living.com


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