ISSUE 20, January 2007
Editorial
Historic: Dr Thomas Barnardo - children's saviour
Travel: South African journey
London Gala Evening: Royal Masonic Variety Show
Centenary Celebrations: Scouting's milestone
Quarterly Communication: Speech by the Pro Grand Master and Report of the Board of General Purposes
Supreme Grand Chapter: Speech by the Pro 1st Grand Principal and Report of the Cttee of General Purposes
Library and Museum: Facets of Fraternity
   Specialist Lodge: Internet Lodge - Masonry on the Web
Special Events: Spamalot and the Alternative Hair Show at Grand Lodge
Freemasons' Hall: ADelphi System - A computer revolution
Mark Master Masons: Duke of Kent at 150th anniversary
Breeches Bible: A Lodge locker's secret
Masonic Arboretum: Planting an idea
Education: Events and The hoodwink
Masonic Charities: RMTGB and Grand Charity and Legacy appeal and RMBI and NMSF
Letters, Book reviews, Gardening

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    You never know what you may find in a Lodge locker, and but for the decision to amalgamate two Lodges, a unique find may have gone undiscovered for many years to come.
    It was back in November 2002 that Lodge of Affability No. 317 was to amalgamate with Villiers Lodge No. 6684 (a Grand Daughter Lodge) in the Province of East Lancashire.
    A decision was taken to check the contents of the Lodge of Affability, with a view to discarding duplicate Masonic material and to update its inventory. Among the items stored were no less than four Bibles.
    The most interesting of them was the oldest – a Geneva Bible dated 1607. Printed on the cover of the bound book was the following inscription:



The Lodge of Affability reference in the Geneva Bible Cum Prievegio
   
The gift of
Brother John Moreton
to the
Lodge of Affability
January 18th A L 5802
This presentation was made three years after Lodge of Affability had been consecrated in 1799. The “Breeches Bible”, as it is commonly known, is a book collector’s term for the Geneva Bible, first printed in 1560. The term derives from the reference in Genesis III, Verse 7, which states:- Then the eyes of them both were opened, and they knew that they were naked and they sewed fig leaves together, and made themselves breeches. This final word, “breeches”, being substituted for “aprons”.
    The Geneva Bible owes its origin to a group of scholars who fled from England to Geneva in Switzerland to escape persecution from Queen Mary, known as the Bloody Queen of England 1553 – 1558. Upon her accession to the throne she banned the printing of English scriptures.
    Being abroad, they translated an English version from Latin, using Greek and Hebrew text. The translators included such Protestant scholars of the day as John Calvin, Myles Coverdale. John Foxe and several other reformers including Theodore Beza.


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