ISSUE 19, October 2006
Editorial
Historic: Rabbi and Mason
Travel: Morocco's exotic charm
Quarterly Communication: Address by the Pro Grand Master and Report of the Board of General Purposes
Working with Youngsters: The Grand Master goes fishing
Community Relations: Saying it with flowers
International: Spanish Freemasonry under the microscope
   Events: Grand Lodge Award; Royal Masonic Variety Show
Specialist Lodges: Masonry on the canal
Freemasonry and Society: A Churchman's view of Masonry
Education: Toast of the town and Events
Young Masons: The Universities Scheme
Library & Museum: The Freemasons's Tontine
Masonic Charities: The Grand Charity and NMSF and RMTGB and RMBI
Letters
Book reviews
Gardening

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One of the most satisfying and enjoyable experiences for the active and enthusiastic Freemason is to have taken part, as Master of his Lodge, in one of the ceremonies, and participating in the ritual to a standard that can only be described as “Satisfaction to yourself and advantage to your Lodge”.
    This would have only been possible as a result of hours of intensive learning, and committing to memory the lines of the ritual, combined with careful preparation in rehearsal and delivery.
    What is quite incomprehensible is the performance of the Master later at the Festive Board, who stumbles along with absolutely no idea how to rule and direct his Lodge. He then proceeds to deliver what is often a boring, incoherent, irrelevant and unimaginative Response to his Toast.
    Why does this happen?
    The reason is simple. The Brother involved does not understand that there is absolutely no difference between the control of procedure at the Festive Board and Masonic speech-making as there is in the technique for the governing of the proceedings, and the enactment of the ritual in the Temple.
    This can be summarised in three simple words: Preparation, Practice and Performance. To become a great ritualist requires training and dedication. This applies equally to becoming an accomplished Master of a Masonic Lodge.
    It is a sad reflection on the preparation of the Master-Elect, who in many Lodges is installed into the chair and immediately comes under the control of the secretary, the director of ceremonies, or a host of the Lodge elders who seem to forget that their status in the Lodge is one of Past Master.
    It is the duty and responsibility of the Master to rule and direct his Lodge. If he is so weak that he needs the constant supervision and instruction from senior members of the Lodge, this is a reflection upon them, that they have not trained him properly in preparation for his high office.
    To be in control requires certain management skills that need to be acquired well in advance of a brother’s installation into the chair of his Lodge.



“I’ve been up and down so many times I feel like Tower Bridge.”



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