ISSUE 19, October 2006
Editorial
Historic: Rabbi and Mason
Travel: Morocco's exotic charm
Quarterly Communication: Address by the Pro Grand Master and Report of the Board of General Purposes
Working with Youngsters: The Grand Master goes fishing
Community Relations: Saying it with flowers
International: Spanish Freemasonry under the microscope
   Events: Grand Lodge Award; Royal Masonic Variety Show
Specialist Lodges: Masonry on the canal
Freemasonry and Society: A Churchman's view of Masonry
Education: Toast of the town and Events
Young Masons: The Universities Scheme
Library & Museum: The Freemasons's Tontine
Masonic Charities: The Grand Charity and NMSF and RMTGB and RMBI
Letters
Book reviews
Gardening

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Between 19 and 23 July the Royal Horticultural Society Flower Show was held at Tatton Park, Cheshire – the ancestral home of two past Provincial Grand Masters of Cheshire – Earl Egerton of Tatton and the 3rd Lord Egerton.
    With the anticipation of some 250,000 visitors to the multitude of gardens and flower exhibits, the show was set to be a resounding success. Nothing new in that you say, with the exception that, in 2006, the Freemasons of Cheshire had designed, built and exhibited a garden entitled The Spirit of Freemasonry.
    Why a garden? The idea came from attempts to communicate with the media in new ways – in this instance the project was to by-pass the media and go direct to our audience – the public.
    Cheshire has created a special projects group, led by Harry Wright, whose aim is to undertake two major projects each year to deliver the Provincial objective of: Dispelling the myths and informing visitors of our work in the community.
    It was this small team who set out to change the way in which the Province communicates with the public and in doing so … be friendly, open and honest about Freemasonry – not to attempt to increase membership directly, merely to offer opportunities for improving the understanding of our organisation and to ensure that visitors are left with a favourable opinion of the Craft.
    The architect and designer of the garden, Peter Kinder, considered his brief carefully, and his description moved many members of the Province and the 80,000 members of the public who visited. Peter outlined the garden as follows:
    The garden depicts the journey of man, from a rough stone to perfection, whilst travelling a path of good and evil, joy and sadness, right and wrong.
    The good and evil of the world we live in is represented by a black and white tiled path, which passes alongside an everpresent danger of water, contrasted with verdant pasture representing peace.
    The journey carries on until the traveller reaches his final resting place, a triangular seat symbolising the three basic principles of the organisation, namely faith, hope and charity.
    The garden’s sundial, with square and compasses – the universal symbol of Freemasonry – depicts the passage of time, over which we have no control.



The Cheshire Masons’ garden designed by Peter Kinder which depicts the journey of man


The design of the garden, entitled “The Spirit of Freemasonry”


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