ISSUE 17, April 2006
Editorial
Historic: The Brother who designed the Spitfire
Travel: The charm of Kerala
Grand Lodge: Pro Grand Master's speech and Quarterly Communication
Public Relations: Hottest spot in town
International: Emulation in Bulgaria and Mauritius takes a leap forward and Hungary's Royal Arch library
Library & Museum: Recent acquisitions
Masonic Bibles: Lodges and their Bibles
    Royal Masonic Girls' School: My thanks to the Freemasons
Holocaust: The Count of Auschwitz
Education: International conference on the history of Freemasonry and Events
Specialist Lodges: Masonry universal - via radio
Masonic Charities: Grand Charity continues to help those in need and New Masonic Samaritan Fund and Royal Masonic Benevolent Institution and Royal Masonic Trust for Girls and Boys
Grand Charity: The Tsunami - one year on and Important Gift Aid information
Letters, Book Reviews, and Gardening

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The idea of a Lodge for radio amateurs first took root in the immediate aftermath of the Second World War, but it was not until 1962 that the project was resurrected, and Radio Fraternity Lodge No. 8040 was consecrated at Freemasons’ Hall, London, on 23 November 1965 – some 20 years after the idea was first put forward.
    Among its distinguished Founders was John Clarricoats (Call Sign g6cl), who had been full-time secretary of the Radio Society of Great Britain (rsgb) for 32 years until his retirement in 1963. He was both the first Lodge Master and subsequently its secretary.
    The Lodge history recalls:

‘A strong reason made to the committee for establishing the new Lodge was that there did not exist, as far as was known then, any such fraternity in the world comprising radio amateurs. London received many foreign radio amateur visitors, some of whom are Masons, to whom they could extend the inviting hand of friendship.’

Since the consecration, Lodge members have maintained a weekly communications “net” every Sunday morning at 9am on the 80 metre band (3.757kHz). This “nine o’clock net” is controlled by the Lodge Master during his year of office.
    This regular link provides the Almoner with up-to-date information about anyone who is unwell or otherwise in need of help. It has also been a golden rule that Freemasonry is not discussed over the air, and new members are told that the Lodge is not a radio club.



Christopher Jones, Radio Fraternity Lodge secretary, in his ‘shack’


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