ISSUE 17, April 2006
Editorial
Historic: The Brother who designed the Spitfire
Travel: The charm of Kerala
Grand Lodge: Pro Grand Master's speech and Quarterly Communication
Public Relations: Hottest spot in town
International: Emulation in Bulgaria and Mauritius takes a leap forward and Hungary's Royal Arch library
Library & Museum: Recent acquisitions
Masonic Bibles: Lodges and their Bibles
    Royal Masonic Girls' School: My thanks to the Freemasons
Holocaust: The Count of Auschwitz
Education: International conference on the history of Freemasonry and Events
Specialist Lodges: Masonry universal - via radio
Masonic Charities: Grand Charity continues to help those in need and New Masonic Samaritan Fund and Royal Masonic Benevolent Institution and Royal Masonic Trust for Girls and Boys
Grand Charity: The Tsunami - one year on and Important Gift Aid information
Letters, Book Reviews, and Gardening

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Barbara Kelland Ė early years at Weybridge and Rickmansworth Masonic schools
    I was polishing my fatherís old desk when I first had the idea of writing a book about my experiences at the Royal Masonic School for Girls. I had lifted the desk top and discovered a small bundle of envelopes tied together with string and addressed in a childís handwriting.
    One day I picked out a letter at random, curious to discover what I had written and was surprised that my mother had kept my little notes for so long. Were they special? Did they mention anything important? The first letter I read informed my mother that we had had our gas masks fitted. Oh, I thought, this was towards the middle of 1939, but to my surprise when I checked the post mark, it turned out to have been September 1938.
    This set me thinking about my early life away from home at the junior and senior Masonic schools and made me realise how my memories of the small details had inevitably faded with the passage of time.
    A few years later, while preparing to move house, I was turning out a tea chest when I came across more bundles of letters. And there were also other personal records: my motherís diary of my early years in the 1930s and documents and papers relating to her life during that decade and the war.
    There were Masonic certificates of registration Ė my fatherís of 1926 with the Star in the East Lodge and my Great Grandfatherís of 1868 with the Macdonald Lodge. I had put all these things in a tea chest, placed it in the loft and forgotten about it.
    As I began to reread my little letters, I thought they might form the basis of a book describing how my mother had got me into the Masonic school, and how I had spent the war years as a pupil.
    And there was also another reason motivating me to write This Time Next Week Ė I wanted to say thank you, acknowledging the anonymous Freemasons who had contributed to my well-being (and my motherís) by making generous financial donations, principally through their Lodges.


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