ISSUE 16, January 2006
Editorial
Historic: Sherlock Holmes incarnate
Travel: In the Footsteps of the Incas
Sport: Batting for England
Grand Lodge: Pro Grand Master's speech and Quarterly Communication
Supreme Grand Chapter: First Grand Principal's speech and Committee of General Purposes
Royal Masonic Girls' School: Stories in windows
Specialist Lodges: Brotherhood of the Angle
    Napoleonic Wars: A Mason's Word
International: Macedonia: New Grand Lodge consecrated and Enthusiasm unbound
Grand Lodge: Development of Freemasons' Hall
Masonic Rebels: Rise and fall
Bristol Museum: A Phoenix from the Ashes
Freemasonry and Religion: United in diversity
Library and Museum: Most glorious of them all
First Aid: Masons learn to shock
Education: The Third Degree and Forthcoming events
Masonic Charities, Letters, Book Reviews, Gardening

 Previous Page 
PLEASE USE THE LINKS ABOVE - OR ON THIS LINE - TO MOVE BETWEEN PAGES




   

Above
When choosing a tree for your garden, remember to choose a tree that will fit into the space you have available. Remember to check their ultimate height and spread, for although all trees start small, many like these Monkey Puzzles can grow into large trees.


When choosing a tree for ‘your ground’ it is essential to think about the roles the tree will serve. Many objectives can be met at once – good autumn colour, a pleasing shape, shade and wildlife benefits are all possible from a single, well-chosen tree. The ideal is to plant a tree that can grow to full maturity with little or no tree surgery. Mistakes in planting a tree are long-lasting, expensive and difficult to rectify.
    Fuelled by greenhouse gases and global warming, the rate of climate change in Britain is accelerating. As trees take many years to mature, it is important to consider what you are planting now as they will reach maturity in a climate that may be very different from the one in which they were planted. Currently there are 2,500 different trees that grow well in British soil, and so amongst them will be those that are more adaptable to the changing climate.
    Some of the primary considerations to consider when choosing a tree for your garden are the space you have – the type of tree, size, shape and proximity to any buildings and structures. Pick a tree that is suitable i.e., not too big or too small. Make your choice before you get to the garden centre or place you are buying it or you may end up choosing the wrong tree.
    The local library can often be a good source for your research. Careful thought is critical to the equation. Other questions to ask yourself are whether you want any colour; do you want it to be good for wildlife; or should it occupy all the space you have available or perhaps just some of it? Will branches interfere with buildings and wires? Will the view that you value so much disappear as the tree becomes too tall or too wide?
    Whatever your requirements now, these could change in the future. For example, if the climate gets hotter, you could very possibly require more shade in your garden, both to preserve whatever you have planted, but also for your own personal benefit.
    With this particular scenario it would be important to find trees that perhaps would not become massive but would, at the same time, fill your criteria.
    Trees are ideal buffers to control wind. For example, if you plant a lot of trees on the downwind side of your garden, into the wind, it will make your garden more sheltered. If you live by the sea, they will not only provide shelter, but will also stop large amounts of salt getting into your soil, enabling your garden to flourish. Sycamores, as an example, are good for restricting salt damage.
    The condition of the soil is also worth consideration. Although most soils can cope, there are some trees that prefer particular soils. Thought also needs to be given as to whether you will be prepared to take the tree down when it stops fulfilling whatever it is that you wanted it to do.
    Another important consideration is that once planted, you may find that it has a preservation order put on it or the local council prevent you taking it down even if you want to.
    Although there is no doubt that there will be a climate change in the future, there is uncertainty, as there are several different climate models, as to what will actually happen over the next 50 years, so be prepared.
   


 Previous Page 
PLEASE USE THE LINKS ABOVE - OR ON THIS LINE - TO MOVE BETWEEN PAGES