ISSUE 16, January 2006
Editorial
Historic: Sherlock Holmes incarnate
Travel: In the Footsteps of the Incas
Sport: Batting for England
Grand Lodge: Pro Grand Master's speech and Quarterly Communication
Supreme Grand Chapter: First Grand Principal's speech and Committee of General Purposes
Royal Masonic Girls' School: Stories in windows
Specialist Lodges: Brotherhood of the Angle
    Napoleonic Wars: A Mason's Word
International: Macedonia: New Grand Lodge consecrated and Enthusiasm unbound
Grand Lodge: Development of Freemasons' Hall
Masonic Rebels: Rise and fall
Bristol Museum: A Phoenix from the Ashes
Freemasonry and Religion: United in diversity
Library and Museum: Most glorious of them all
First Aid: Masons learn to shock
Education: The Third Degree and Forthcoming events
Masonic Charities, Letters, Book Reviews, Gardening

 Previous Page 
PLEASE USE THE LINKS ABOVE - OR ON THIS LINE - TO MOVE BETWEEN PAGES
 Next Page 













Above
Our equipment in use at Brian House, Blackpool

Below
Naomi House, Winchester
    Lifelites started life within the Royal Masonic Trust for Girls and Boys (RMTGB) in 1998 as the Lifelites Project, with a pilot scheme in one hospice. That scheme was such a success that Lifelites was adopted by the RMTGB as its Project for the Millennium, with the aim of providing computer equipment to every children’s hospice in England and Wales.
    Since 1998, Lifelites has gone from strength to strength and recently celebrated its fifth birthday by announcing support for the Shooting Star House Children’s Hospice – the 34th installation within its network.
    On 1st January 2006, as a mark of its success, Lifelites became a charity in its own right.
    Lifelites is designed to help improve the quality of life for young people with lifelimiting illnesses. Its aim is to ensure that specially designed computer networks are provided in every children’s hospice across the country, with each hospice connected as part of a network to every other hospice in the scheme.
    Lifelites computers enable the children to continue their education whilst in hospice care, pursue their interests and activities, and keep in close touch with family and friends. Training for hospice staff is also provided.
    A children’s hospice supports children and young people who are expected to die before, or shortly after, reaching adulthood. By providing care either at home or in a purpose-built environment, highly trained staff assist the children and their families with the medical and emotional challenges that having a serious illness or condition brings, and they help them to make the most of their lives.
    At the Annual General Court of the RMTGB in June 2005, the President, VW Bro Andrew Stebbings, announced that:
    “Following a strategic review it had been decided that Lifelites should be established as a separate charity which is able to seek both Masonic and non-Masonic support. Funding will be provided to secure the future of the new charity and the RMTGB will continue to provide administrative support”.
    The Lifelites IT infrastructure supports multi-media communications and computer-aided educational and recreational amenities at all of the hospices in a safe and secure environment.
    A typical installation includes a computer suite with internet access, specially designed peripherals such as keyboards and mice, portable PCs on trolleys, a large-screen plasma television and a video/DVD player.
    Drawing on funding provided by the RMTGB, Lifelites works closely with the Worshipful Company of Information Technologists (WCIT). Each Lifelites’ scheme is based upon the EZ<>IT concept, developed by the WCIT, and provides a reliable networked system suitable for children of all ages.


 Previous Page 
PLEASE USE THE LINKS ABOVE - OR ON THIS LINE - TO MOVE BETWEEN PAGES
 Next Page