ISSUE 16, January 2006
Editorial
Historic: Sherlock Holmes incarnate
Travel: In the Footsteps of the Incas
Sport: Batting for England
Grand Lodge: Pro Grand Master's speech and Quarterly Communication
Supreme Grand Chapter: First Grand Principal's speech and Committee of General Purposes
Royal Masonic Girls' School: Stories in windows
Specialist Lodges: Brotherhood of the Angle
    Napoleonic Wars: A Mason's Word
International: Macedonia: New Grand Lodge consecrated and Enthusiasm unbound
Grand Lodge: Development of Freemasons' Hall
Masonic Rebels: Rise and fall
Bristol Museum: A Phoenix from the Ashes
Freemasonry and Religion: United in diversity
Library and Museum: Most glorious of them all
First Aid: Masons learn to shock
Education: The Third Degree and Forthcoming events
Masonic Charities, Letters, Book Reviews, Gardening

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Above
The stain glass window and dedication by Lady Wantage to her husband and father (Lord Overstone) in All Saints Church, Wing, Buckinghamshire.

    The British and their allies did not follow up this victory at Alma, allowed the Russian troops to escape and marched instead to Sevastopol, where they commenced a siege. Here, the British troops held the right flank which included the Heights of Inkerman, and it was here that the Russians launched a massive attack early in the morning of 5 November 1854.
    Robert Lindsay, now Captain, had been on picket duty during the night and was about to return to camp when the attack started. He led his company into battle, pausing only to discard their greatcoats to enable them to run faster. He and his men were involved in hand-to-hand fighting with the Russian troops. For his actions in both these battles Lindsay became one of the first recipients of the Victoria Cross.
    Lindsay’s army career had come about largely by accident. Born in 1832 into an upper class family, his childhood was spent in Scotland. He went to Eton and then prepared to enter Haileybury in order to qualify for civil service life in India – a prospect which did not excite him. When one of his sister’s admirers offered him instead a commission in the Scots Fusilier Guards, he readily accepted.
    After Inkerman Lindsay served briefly as aide-de-camp to General Sir James Simpson, senior officer in command of British troops in the Crimea and a friend of his father, before becoming adjutant of his regiment in August 1855. On his return from the Crimea, Lindsay served briefly as equerry in the new household of the young Prince of Wales (later Edward VII), but left shortly after his marriage in 1858.
    His wife, Harriet, was the daughter of Samuel Jones Loyd, first Baron Overstone, one of the richest men in England. Overstone endowed the couple with a considerable fortune and land in Berkshire, based on the Lockinge estate near Wantage.
    Lindsay retired from the army and concentrated on developing this estate into one of the largest in the county. He was an innovative landowner, using the latest machinery and experimenting with irrigation. He built model housing for his agricultural workers and improved their pay.
    The estate gave him local prominence and he served as Conservative MP for Berkshire from 1865 to 1885. He was appointed Lord Lieutenant in 1886.
    Loyd-Lindsay (he assumed the name after his marriage) also became a pioneer and advocate of the volunteer movement which grew in the 1860s, partly in response to a perceived aristocratic mismanagement of the Crimean War, and partly as an attempt to provide an economic and efficient means of national defence.


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