ISSUE 16, January 2006
Editorial
Historic: Sherlock Holmes incarnate
Travel: In the Footsteps of the Incas
Sport: Batting for England
Grand Lodge: Pro Grand Master's speech and Quarterly Communication
Supreme Grand Chapter: First Grand Principal's speech and Committee of General Purposes
Royal Masonic Girls' School: Stories in windows
Specialist Lodges: Brotherhood of the Angle
    Napoleonic Wars: A Mason's Word
International: Macedonia: New Grand Lodge consecrated and Enthusiasm unbound
Grand Lodge: Development of Freemasons' Hall
Masonic Rebels: Rise and fall
Bristol Museum: A Phoenix from the Ashes
Freemasonry and Religion: United in diversity
Library and Museum: Most glorious of them all
First Aid: Masons learn to shock
Education: The Third Degree and Forthcoming events
Masonic Charities, Letters, Book Reviews, Gardening

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To mark the 150th Anniversary of the presentation of the first medals in 1856, the Library and Museum of Freemasonry is mounting a new exhibition about some holders of the Victoria Cross who were also Freemasons.
    The criterion for the award is simple – conspicuous valour in the presence of the enemy – but its winners have been drawn from all sections of the armed forces (and include some civilians under military command) and from all walks of life.
    In September 1854 an army of British, French and Turkish troops reached the valley of the Alma River in southern Russia. Occupying the rolling hills on the far side was a large Russian army intent on preventing them reaching Sevastopol.
   
© Hulton Archive / Getty Images

Above
Lord Wantage in January 1882
    In the ensuing battle, the front covered four miles, with French and Turkish troops attacking the more lightly defended Russian left flank and British troops attacking the heavily manned centre and right. The Russian strongpoint was a battery of 12 guns positioned behind a breastwork which commanded the ground between the Russian position and the British attack – later known as the “Great Redoubt”.
    The Light Division, in the face of tremendous fire, managed to force their way into the Great Redoubt and caused the Russian Army to haul all but two of their guns away. The Division then found itself facing large numbers of Russian troops.
    The Brigade of Guards were to provide reinforcement, but under an inexperienced commander, the Duke of Cambridge, were making slow progress and only the Scots Fusilier Guards had crossed the river. They were ordered to advance without waiting for the Grenadiers and the Coldstreams.
    Given misleading information, the Light Division began running back into the advancing Fusiliers. The Scots Fusiliers’ colour party, led by Senior Subaltern Robert Lindsay, aged 22, continued to advance steadily. He called out for the retiring troops to rally on the colours.
    Under enemy fire, the colour that Lindsay was carrying was shot through in a dozen places and, at one stage, the staff was cut in two and the colour fell on top of him. He was seen to rise and wave the flag. His example and courage enabled order to be restored until the rest of the Brigade arrived and pushed the Russian troops out of the Great Redoubt and back up the slope.

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