ISSUE 16, January 2006
Editorial
Historic: Sherlock Holmes incarnate
Travel: In the Footsteps of the Incas
Sport: Batting for England
Grand Lodge: Pro Grand Master's speech and Quarterly Communication
Supreme Grand Chapter: First Grand Principal's speech and Committee of General Purposes
Royal Masonic Girls' School: Stories in windows
Specialist Lodges: Brotherhood of the Angle
    Napoleonic Wars: A Mason's Word
International: Macedonia: New Grand Lodge consecrated and Enthusiasm unbound
Grand Lodge: Development of Freemasons' Hall
Masonic Rebels: Rise and fall
Bristol Museum: A Phoenix from the Ashes
Freemasonry and Religion: United in diversity
Library and Museum: Most glorious of them all
First Aid: Masons learn to shock
Education: The Third Degree and Forthcoming events
Masonic Charities, Letters, Book Reviews, Gardening

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Visitors to the Masonic Hall at Bristol could be forgiven for thinking that it has been unchanged for generations, but its turbulent history shows how Masonry can overcome seemingly insurmountable difficulties.
    Bristol is unique as a Province in that it is also a city. It preserves rituals and customs from before the creation of the United Grand Lodge of England, including the passing of the veils.
    Indeed, local legend has the Grand Lodge representative arriving to instruct the Province to change, only to be dined so well that he reeled back to London the next day with his message still undelivered! The Masonic Hall in Park Street was originally the home of the Philosophical Society of Bristol and was bought by the Province in 1871. It is classical and has a frieze showing Apollo and Minerva introducing art, science and literature to Bristol.
    The frieze is by Edward Hodges Bailey, a Mason and former pupil of Bristol Grammar School. He is most famous for the statue of Nelson in Trafalgar Square, but also sculpted the massive statue of the Duke of Sussex that stood in the Grand Temple in London until its rebuilding in the 1930s, and which is still on display at Freemasons’ Hall.
    The Bristol Hall presents an elegant but bland face to the world. In 1940 the building was refurbished with stonework, cleaned and re-roofed, but within months of it being completed it was almost totally destroyed by German bombs, along with much of the historic city in November that year.
   


Above
Wooden case from India, jug recovered from wartime rubble, horn depicting a tracing board, three jewels recovered from the rubble, World War I German air gunner’s badge and various Masonic symbols.


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