ISSUE 16, January 2006
Editorial
Historic: Sherlock Holmes incarnate
Travel: In the Footsteps of the Incas
Sport: Batting for England
Grand Lodge: Pro Grand Master's speech and Quarterly Communication
Supreme Grand Chapter: First Grand Principal's speech and Committee of General Purposes
Royal Masonic Girls' School: Stories in windows
Specialist Lodges: Brotherhood of the Angle
    Napoleonic Wars: A Mason's Word
International: Macedonia: New Grand Lodge consecrated and Enthusiasm unbound
Grand Lodge: Development of Freemasons' Hall
Masonic Rebels: Rise and fall
Bristol Museum: A Phoenix from the Ashes
Freemasonry and Religion: United in diversity
Library and Museum: Most glorious of them all
First Aid: Masons learn to shock
Education: The Third Degree and Forthcoming events
Masonic Charities, Letters, Book Reviews, Gardening

 Previous Page 
PLEASE USE THE LINKS ABOVE - OR ON THIS LINE - TO MOVE BETWEEN PAGES
 Next Page 







Above
Two female Saints, Etheldreda and Margaret
    Generations of pupils at the Royal Masonic School for Girls at Rickmansworth in Hertfordshire have passed them or sat under them while eating or listening to a sermon. But, by and large, one suspects that the extraordinary wealth of paintings and stained glass in the school has been accepted by most pupils and staff – familiar but only as part of the fabric.
    Yet the art in the school deserved more than a passing nod, and in conjunction with Jennifer Brooke, I decided to spend some time researching the lives and work of the three artists primarily responsible for decorating the school.
    The oldest stained glass, largely sited in the Assembly Hall and along its adjacent corridors, was produced by a preeminent stained glass master, Edward Frampton (1850-1929).
    Frampton, the son of a Dorset man, had to overcome the resistance of a sternly non-conformist family before he was allowed to abandon law and study art.
    Even so, permission was only given on the understanding that he should confine his studies to ecclesiastical art! But such art ran in the family because his only son, Edward Reginald Frampton – who died before his father in 1923 – also became a distinguished landscape, figure and religious painter and sculptor.
    The windows were presented by various prominent Masons and were installed over the period 1891-1904, but only some are signed with Frampton’s name. As there were some 20 glass-painters in Frampton’s studio in Buckingham Palace Road, London, presumably apprentices helped with the mammoth production.
    All Frampton’s work was transferred from the old school in Clapham. The huge stained glass windows in the Assembly Hall show the arms of the Masonic Provinces and Lodges that presented them, with the ‘Royal’ window dominating. This includes the arms of Edward VII – then serving his long apprenticeship as Prince of Wales – and other 19th century minor Royal patrons of the school.
    Frampton was apparently an avid reader, with Dickens and Shakespeare particular favourites, and the windows illustrate stories from Shakespeare, Milton, Chaucer, Tennyson, Browning, Goldsmith, Spenser, Macaulay, Campbell and the Ingoldsby Legends.
    Unfortunately, the rumbustious and colourful Shakespearian pictures, which include a splendid Falstaff, are placed on the Administration block staircase. It is a good site to display their attractions, but has the major disadvantage that the pictures are seldom if ever seen by the students they were presumably designed to amuse and edify.


 Previous Page 
PLEASE USE THE LINKS ABOVE - OR ON THIS LINE - TO MOVE BETWEEN PAGES
 Next Page