ISSUE 16, January 2006
Editorial
Historic: Sherlock Holmes incarnate
Travel: In the Footsteps of the Incas
Sport: Batting for England
Grand Lodge: Pro Grand Master's speech and Quarterly Communication
Supreme Grand Chapter: First Grand Principal's speech and Committee of General Purposes
Royal Masonic Girls' School: Stories in windows
Specialist Lodges: Brotherhood of the Angle
    Napoleonic Wars: A Mason's Word
International: Macedonia: New Grand Lodge consecrated and Enthusiasm unbound
Grand Lodge: Development of Freemasons' Hall
Masonic Rebels: Rise and fall
Bristol Museum: A Phoenix from the Ashes
Freemasonry and Religion: United in diversity
Library and Museum: Most glorious of them all
First Aid: Masons learn to shock
Education: The Third Degree and Forthcoming events
Masonic Charities, Letters, Book Reviews, Gardening

 Previous Page 
PLEASE USE THE LINKS ABOVE - OR ON THIS LINE - TO MOVE BETWEEN PAGES
 Next Page 







Above
Peruvian boy with a llama
        Having spent several days in Lima – or rather Miraflores – an upmarket suburb, where we were warned not to go out alone, it was a pleasure to be able to wander the streets of Cusco, once the capital of the Inca empire, and a UNESCO World Heritage site. The city is 3,710 metres above sea level and so, particularly if you arrive by plane, you have to acclimatise yourself to the altitude.
    Coca tea, a derivative of cocaine, is served in all the hotels to combat this. At the luxurious Monasterio Hotel, oxygen is pumped into the bedrooms to alleviate any headache or sickness problems. The vast main square, which is always a hub of activity, has an amazing array of architecture, and includes a Renaissance-style cathedral with an incredibly ornate and lavish interior. Don’t miss, within its walls, a painting of The Last Supper, where the meal in the forefront of the painting is that of a skinned guinea pig, one of the specialities of the area. I joined my fellow travellers at a meal where they all decided to taste this local delicacy, which was served whole at the table with a tomato in its mouth.
    Ceviche – raw marinated white fish – is another meal to try, as it is Peru’s national dish. The country makes its own wine, which is very drinkable. The beverage served as an aperitif wherever you go is Pisco Sour, also made from grapes which, depending on your host and his magnitude, can be very intoxicating!
    One of the advantages of being with a tour is that the tour operator, particularly in Peru, will have access to some places where you may not be able to go on your own. In Lima, we dined close to the city’s historical centre at the Casa-Solar de Aliaga. Originally home to the co-founder of the city, and still inhabited by his ancestors, it was originally built in 1535, and is full of beautiful artefacts. Another day, we ate at the Casa Hacienda Orihuela, home of the Orihuelas family, collectors of popular and colonial art, which is off the beaten track in the Sacred Valley.
    Private museums are, apparently, quite common. We were taken to an ordinary-looking house in Miraflores, one of the more expensive suburbs of Lima. Once inside, we were surrounded by an amazing collection of art, not just in the form of paintings but also valuable collectables.

Below
Machu Picchu - the lost city of the Incas, built around 1440



 Previous Page 
PLEASE USE THE LINKS ABOVE - OR ON THIS LINE - TO MOVE BETWEEN PAGES
 Next Page