ISSUE 15, October 2005
Editorial
Historic: Nelson and Freemasonry
Grand Lodge: Pro Grand Master's Speech
Grand Lodge: Quarterly Communication
Hurricane Katrina: Grand Charity Relief Chest
Royal Arch: John Knight
Masonic Embroidery: A stitch in time...
Travel: Walzing along the Danube
Specialist Lodges: Martial arts
Library & Museum: The two Freemasons' Halls
    Anniversary: Jersey's Liberation
Anniversary: Dorset's 225 years
Obituaries: Lord Swansea OSM
Pro Grand Master: Whither directing our course?
Charmian Hussey: A Mason's wife on Masonry
International: The Grand Lodge of Israel
Education: Sheffield's big plans
Education: Forthcoming events
Education: The Second Degree
Masonic Charities
Letters, Book Reviews, Gardening

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Above:
Douglas Knoop, after whom the new Centre is named



Above:
Artist’s impression of the new Centre for Masonic Research


Andrew Prescott is director of the Centre for Research into Freemasonry at the University of Sheffield
    The development of the Centre for Research into Freemasonry (CRF) at the University of Sheffield, the first Centre devoted to academic research into Freemasonry in a British university, will enter an exciting new phase in early 2006, when it moves into new premises at the University’s Humanities Research Institute (HRI).
     Since its establishment in 2000, the CRF has been based in the offices of the HRI in the 1960s Arts Tower building which dominates the University’s campus.
     One of the reasons why the study of Freemasonry is such an exciting area of academic research is that it connects with a wide range of different subject areas, and the CRF has benefited greatly from being based in a unit such as the HRI, which enables the Centre readily to make contact with academics in many different disciplines.
     In the first half of 2006, the CRF will move into splendid new facilities in a renovated early Victorian villa on the site of the former Jessop Hospital for Women at the heart of the University’s campus.
     The Jessop Hospital opened in 1878 and was closed in 2001. The acquisition of the former hospital site is enabling the University to create a more integrated campus and to replace existing cramped accommodation for a number of University departments.
     With the aid of a generous charitable donation, a dramatic and beautiful extension is being built in the former gardens of the villa which will provide a new home for the CRF.
     The new building will provide expanded office space for the Centre, space for visiting Masonic scholars, and special storage for the Centre’s growing collection of Masonic research resources.
     The new building will also provide beautifully appointed new facilities for the Centre’s programme of conferences, seminar and study days. There will be a lecture theatre, seminar room and break-out space, all equipped with state-of-the-art audio visual equipment. It is hoped that there will also be space for small exhibitions of books and artefacts.
     Above all, the new building will provide an attractive setting for the Centre’s teaching activities, and the technical facilities of the new building will assist in making the activities of the Centre available to those who cannot get to Sheffield.
     The new premises will provide a perfect environment to showcase the work of the Centre and the exciting academic work which has been funded by United Grand Lodge of England, Supreme Grand Chapter, Yorkshire West Riding Province and Lord Northampton.
     The new building has been designed by the Sheffield firm of Bond Bryan, whose other works includes the new South Stand of Hillsborough football ground, the Shropshire campus of the University of Wolverhampton, and part of the English Sports Institute at the University of Loughborough. Contractors for the project are the long-established York construction and civil engineering firm, William Birch and Sons.
     The new extension will be named after Douglas Knoop (1883–1948), who was Professor of Economics in the University of Sheffield from 1920 to 1948 and Master of Quatuor Coronati Lodge No. 2076, the premier Lodge of Masonic research. Knoop was the inspirational leader of the ‘Sheffield school’, whose other members were Professors Gwilym Jones and Douglas Hamer and which produced the largest and most influential single body of research by British scholars into the history of Freemasonry. Knoop’s background in economics and his collaboration with literary scholars in works which remain standard references for historians, prefigured the kind of interdisciplinary outlook which the HRI and the CRF seek to develop. The programme which the CRF will offer in its new home is still being finalised, but details of initial events will be given in the next issue of MQ.


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