ISSUE 15, October 2005
Editorial
Historic: Nelson and Freemasonry
Grand Lodge: Pro Grand Master's Speech
Grand Lodge: Quarterly Communication
Hurricane Katrina: Grand Charity Relief Chest
Royal Arch: John Knight
Masonic Embroidery: A stitch in time...
Travel: Walzing along the Danube
Specialist Lodges: Martial arts
Library & Museum: The two Freemasons' Halls
    Anniversary: Jersey's Liberation
Anniversary: Dorset's 225 years
Obituaries: Lord Swansea OSM
Pro Grand Master: Whither directing our course?
Charmian Hussey: A Mason's wife on Masonry
International: The Grand Lodge of Israel
Education: Sheffield's big plans
Education: Forthcoming events
Education: The Second Degree
Masonic Charities
Letters, Book Reviews, Gardening

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Photos: David Peabody

    There is a veritable treasure trove at Freemasons’ Hall in London, tucked away in the basement, but which carries out work for Freemasons which adorns many an individual Mason, and many Lodges – the embroidery department.
     Anna Fernandes, who is in charge of the department, has been involved with the department for more than 20 years and has two assistants – Zafar Saleem and Carol Williams.
     The walls and tables are filled to overflowing with banners, aprons, alms bags and much else, bringing a cacophony of colour which symbolises the rich tapestry of Freemasonry.
     In addition, they also carry out repairs for other organisations such as the Masonic School for Girls and an altar cover for St Paul’s Church in nearby Covent Garden. And, to show the diversity of work carried out, Coppers, a ‘hearing’ dog for the deaf, whose training was funded by Freemasons, wears an embroidered jacket when he escorts his owner to Masonic meetings.
     Anna has long experience in the trade, having been a successful quality controller in the clothing industry and a distinguished spell at the London College of Fashion before coming to Freemasons’ Hall in May 1984.
     One thing Anna realised from the start was that to achieve success, modern computerised techniques used in embroidery would be essential, and a special machine now does much of the work.
     Indeed, designs can be faxed to Anna and the team will reproduce it faithfully to the instructions on the machine.
     The next task was to digitise the department’s own specialist programs, which has also been successfully completed.
     Indeed, the first “in-house” banners that started it all have all now been replaced.




Left:
Anna with one of her banners



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