ISSUE 12, January 2005

Editorial
Kitchener of Khartoum: Mason extraordinary
Travel: Where east meets west
Veteran Honoured: Old soldier remembered
Royal Masonic Family: The Six Masonic Sons of George III, Part 1
Supreme Grand Chapter: Speech of the Pro First Grand Principal and, Report of the Committee of General Purposes
  Quarterly Communication: Address of the Pro Grand Master and, Report of the Board of General Purposes
Metropolitan Grand Lodge of London: London's first consecration
Soccer: Man in the Middle
Wales: Joseph Parry - flawed genius?
Library & Museum: Donations gather pace
Education: Dates for your diary and, Planning a 'white table' and, Looking to the future and, Time marches on
Grand Charity: General meeting and non-Masonic grant list
Masonic Charities: Reports from the four main charities
Letters, Book reviews, Gardening

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Left
Two jewels once owned by Sir Alfred Robbins, President of the Board of General Purposes
Centre
A Masonic toast rack, probably late Victorian
Right
A jug from the Ancient order of Foresters, mid-19th century


Demilitarisation was policed by troops from France and Britain stationed there. The Lodge was formed from the work of the British Masonic Society in Rhineland and met under the sanction of the Lodge of Honour and Generosity No. 165, London. The sanction was granted at their regular meeting on 27 March 1923.
     The Cologne Lodge of Instruction then began arranging furniture, jewels and by-laws for the Lodge. Eventually there were 50 founders, and the Lodge held its first meeting on 10 July 1923, meeting at the Army College, Hansa Ring, Cologne.
     As the Lodge grew, these premises became too small, and in 1924 they moved to more suitable accommodation at Antoniter Strasse, Cologne. Following the Locarno Treaty, agreed in 1925, which helped to normalise relations with Germany, there was a phased withdrawal of British and French troops which was completed in 1930.
     With its members being reduced as they returned to Britain, the Lodge closed and the last meeting was held on 28 August 1929. It is striking how even a small jewel can tell such a fascinating story a poignant reminder of its times.
     As regular readers of MQ will be aware, the Library and Museum also purchases objects and books from time to time, and September was unusually busy in this respect.
     Among the purchases were two very fine jewels once owned by Sir Alfred Robbins, a former parliamentary lobby correspondent and President of the Board of General Purposes 1913-1931.
     These comprised one from Gallery Lodge No. 1928 in recognition of valuable services rendered as Treasurer of the Benevolent Fund, and the other from Gallery Chapter No. 1928, as PZ 1904-1905. The Lodge was formed for men working as journalists and on the Official Report, Hansard, in the Houses of Parliament.
     Both the Lodge and Chapter badge is the Royal Coat of Arms as an orb, encircled by a garter with text honi soit qui mal y pense, surmounted by a crown with a banner above reading `Houses of Parliament'.
     To add to our collection of clocks, we also purchased a French clock in a gilt bronze case decorated with books and Masonic working tools. The case can be dated to the period 1820-1830, but the clock itself has an earlier Paris movement.
     Thanks to a generous donation from the Roy Wells Charitable Trust, the Library and Museum has been able to purchase the recently published new edition of the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography all 60 volumes covering 50,000 lives an extremely useful research tool.
     Finally, we also had some success during the month at two auctions. Our first purchase was a 19th century ceramic jug decorated with emblems and mottoes relating to the Ancient Order of Foresters, one of the oldest friendly societies.
     We already have a number of pieces of regalia relating to this Order, and the jug was purchased as a representative piece of ceramics to support this collection of regalia.
     Our other purchase was a silver plated Masonic toast rack with square and compass uprights (to hold the toast!) and levels for feet. An intriguing and beautifully designed object which is, perhaps surprisingly, the first toast rack in the collection!
     We were fortunate in September to be presented with, or purchased, a number of extraordinary items. We are very grateful to all the donors and to those who donated in all the other months of the year!
     As a matter of policy we do not generally disclose publicly the identity of individual donors, although this information is recorded in our records. Thanks also to the Friends of the Library and Museum and other individuals and Lodges which have made monetary donations, which have enabled us to make these purchases.


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