ISSUE 12, January 2005

Editorial
Kitchener of Khartoum: Mason extraordinary
Travel: Where east meets west
Veteran Honoured: Old soldier remembered
Royal Masonic Family: The Six Masonic Sons of George III, Part 1
Supreme Grand Chapter: Speech of the Pro First Grand Principal and, Report of the Committee of General Purposes
  Quarterly Communication: Address of the Pro Grand Master and, Report of the Board of General Purposes
Metropolitan Grand Lodge of London: London's first consecration
Soccer: Man in the Middle
Wales: Joseph Parry - flawed genius?
Library & Museum: Donations gather pace
Education: Dates for your diary and, Planning a 'white table' and, Looking to the future and, Time marches on
Grand Charity: General meeting and non-Masonic grant list
Masonic Charities: Reports from the four main charities
Letters, Book reviews, Gardening

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William Henry, Duke of Clarence
George's third son William, born in 1765, was sent to sea at the age of 13 to become a Midshipman. William took to Navy life. He was involved in the capture of a Spanish convoy in 1779, was thrown in the brig for brawling in Gibraltar and visited New York in 1781 at the height of the War of Independence.
     He became a friend of Nelson and gave away the bride at Nelson's wedding in 1787. He was the first of the six brothers to be made a Mason in 1786, joining Prince George Lodge No. 86 in Plymouth. This Lodge, which was comprised of naval and army officers, was erased in 1828. As with his broth ers, he was made a Past Grand Master. He took a keen interest in Freemasonry, joining the Prince of Wales's Lodge, of which he became Master in 1827.
     In 1790 he started a relationship with an actress, Dorothy Jordan, and fathered ten children by her, all with the surname Fitzclarence. His naval career petered out during the Napoleonic wars, and in 1818 he settled down to marry Princess Adelaide of Saxe-Meiningen. They had two daughters but neither survived.
     On the death of George IV in 1830, William became King William IV. He reigned for only seven years, but presided over some major changes to the British political system including the Reform Bills of 1831 and 1832, which led to the demise of rotten or pocket boroughs.
     William gave up Freemasonry when he became king. Prince of Wales's Lodge members were given permission to line their aprons with garter blue to mark his accession, and his brother Augustus Frederick succeeded him as Master of the Lodge.

Part II will appear in the next issue of MQ.



Left
Bust of the Duke of York
Right
Bust of William IV
Both currently in Freemasons' Hall


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