ISSUE 12, January 2005

Editorial
Kitchener of Khartoum: Mason extraordinary
Travel: Where east meets west
Veteran Honoured: Old soldier remembered
Royal Masonic Family: The Six Masonic Sons of George III, Part 1
Supreme Grand Chapter: Speech of the Pro First Grand Principal and, Report of the Committee of General Purposes
  Quarterly Communication: Address of the Pro Grand Master and, Report of the Board of General Purposes
Metropolitan Grand Lodge of London: London's first consecration
Soccer: Man in the Middle
Wales: Joseph Parry - flawed genius?
Library & Museum: Donations gather pace
Education: Dates for your diary and, Planning a 'white table' and, Looking to the future and, Time marches on
Grand Charity: General meeting and non-Masonic grant list
Masonic Charities: Reports from the four main charities
Letters, Book reviews, Gardening

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The Six Masonic Sons of George III:
Part I


George III (1738-1820) is probably best known for his long reign, his "madness" and for losing the American War of Independence. However, Freemasons should remember him for other reasons.
     George was the grandson of George II and the son of Frederick Lewis, Prince of Wales (1707-1751), the first Royal Freemason. Frederick Lewis led a hedonistic lifestyle and died before his father, thrusting George onto the thrones of England and Hanover in 1760 at the age of just 20.
     A year later he married Princess Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz and fathered 15 children in 22 years. George, unlike George I and George II, was popular with his English subjects.
     Born in England, he spoke English and preferred to live in England. Unlike his father, he was prudent, Tory, interested in agriculture, and according to Georgian society, the ruler of the dullest court in Europe.
     This was also in marked contrast to his brothers, who like Frederick Lewis, enjoyed parties, drinking, gambling and running up huge debts. Three of George's brothers followed Frederick Lewis into Freemasonry, including Henry, Duke of Cumberland (1745-1790) who, in 1782, became Grand Master of the Premier Grand Lodge of England.     George III never became a Freemason himself. However, he did father seven sons who lived to maturity, of whom six became Freemasons. Those six sons were: George, Prince of Wales; Frederick Augustus, Duke of York; William Henry, Duke of Clarence; Edward Augustus, Duke of Kent; Ernest Augustus, Duke of Cumberland and Augustus Frederick, Duke of Sussex.
     They were men of very differing characters, with contrasting political and personal outlooks on life, but all found something in Freemasonry, which is why they are all worth examining as individual men and Freemasons.



George III and family
All photographs copyright and courtesey of the Library & Museum, United Grand Lodge of England


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